Greasy Beans

In one of my “daring gardening experiments,” I decided to try Greasy Beans. Greasies are called greasy because they don’t have the fine hairs on their pods like regular pole beans. You can see my previous post about Greasies here.

They grew just like regular pole beans here in my southeastern Connecticut garden. I had them on posts growing with Scarlet Runner Beans (because I like the flowers) and cukes.

Greasy Beans on the vine

Greasies on the vine.

And they are delicious. This is one garden experiment that I will definitely repeat. Here’s one way I prepare them.

Colander full of Greasy Beans

Greasies on the counter, ready to cook. Mmmm.

Greasy Beans with Onion and Bacon
Servings: 2

1 lb. greasy beans, trimmed and cut into bite-sized pieces
2 slices bacon, chopped
1/2 medium onion, slivered

Trim and rinse beans and place in a pot of boiling salted water. Have an ice-water bath ready. Blanch beans in boiling water until crisp-tender, cool off in ice water and set into colander to drain.

Cook chopped bacon in a skillet until it releases some of its fat, then add onion slivers. Cook bacon and onion until onions are just beginning to brown and bacon is crisp. Add drained beans and cook until rewarmed. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Nutrition information per serving: Calories 220, Total Fat 10.2g, Cholesterol 28mg, Sodium 645mg, Total Carb. 18.7g, Fiber 8.2g, Sugars 4.3g, Protein 14.4g

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About auntie beak

Auntie Beak is the resident garden geek. She blogs at auntiebeak.com. Stop in for a visit!
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